Saturday, March 29, 2014

Sea of Shadows by Kelley Armstrong Review

Title: Sea of Shadows
Author: Kelley Armstrong
Age Group: Teen/Young Adult
Genre: Fantasy/Horror
Series: Age of Legends, book one
Star Rating: 2 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: Despite original worldbuilding and an original premise, Sea of Shadows fell short for me--serious pacing issues really bogged this book down, much to my disappointment.

This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Twins Ashyn and Moira are the Seeker and Keeper of Edgewood, home of the Forest of the Dead. They have been trained since childhood: their job is to appease the angry, restless spirits that haunt the dark woods beyond their village. But on the night that the girls must do the ancient spiritual rites alone, they find their lives shattered: Their entire village has been brutally slaughtered by creatures who live in the darkness. Led on a journey to find help, the girls find that their lives may be in danger.. And even they cannot save everyone..

What I enjoyed:
-I really liked the premise of the novel, it was dark and original
-The worldbuilding of this novel really worked, too--the vast Empire and its complex workings, a world so much different from our own
-Moira and Ashyn, two twins who as different from one another as night and day, but as close as two sisters can be
-There were a lot of bloody, violent, dark spots that had me cringing, but I liked them anyway
-Ronan
-Gavril in particular--he was a deeply layered character and I enjoyed him
-The way the novel ended

What could've been better:
-There were definitely some serious pacing issues in this book--it seemed to have trouble keeping good pace and it almost ruined the book for me altogether
-I really feel like the first two thirds of the book were just the girls journeying, with nothing significant really happening until the last hundred pages of the novel

I really, really wanted to love Sea of Shadows, but it just didn't work for me. Next on deck: Break My Heart 1,000 Times by Daniel Waters!

Friday, March 28, 2014

The Golden Apple by Michelle Diener Review

Title: The Golden Apple
Author: Michelle Diener
Age Group: Teen/Young Adult
Genre: Fantasy/Romance
Series: The Golden Apple, book one
Star Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: A romantic, fun thrill ride of an adventure, I enjoyed The Golden Apple, despite some flaws--a light, fun fantasy.

This novel was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Kayla, Princess of Gaynor, is her own woman. But despite that, her father has offered up her hand in marriage to the highest bidder--that is, the man who can snatch the golden apple from her lap--like a piece of meat. Rane, a simple woodsman, has just deflowered Kayla the night before, having his own reasons for participating in the contest. But when the contest ends, the two find themselves thrust into a web of power, deception, and danger--leading across the country in a desperate race against time, to save what they both hold dear, and each other.

What I enjoyed:
-The premise of the novel was really interesting, a combination of the movie Brave and a fairy tale--I really liked it
-Kayla--I liked the way she was such a strong character, defiant, headstrong, beautiful and yet still full of depth
-Rane, and his devotion to his family--at first he really seemed like quite the rake, but I really grew to like him
-The journey that is led throughout the novel, full of magic and danger and romance
-The chemistry between Kayla and Rane, crackling with heat and electricity throughout the entire novel
-The pacing of the novel was breakneck, but it wasn't hard to follow at all--it was very smooth
-The mythology of the novel, particularly with the way magic tied into the novel
-Eric, a truly terrifying villain--he was frightening and scary and truly evil
-The cliffhanger ending, promising a sequel

What could've been better:
-Kayla, in the beginning, was hard for me to relate to, acting like a spoiled brat for the first part of the book
-It was very light, lighter than I was expecting
-I wish Rane's and Kayla's origins were both explained better, more deeply

I liked The Golden Apple--a light, enjoyable romp of an adventure! Next on deck: Sea of Shadows by Kelley Armstrong!

Thursday, March 27, 2014

The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness Review

Title: The Knife of Never Letting Go
Author: Patrick Ness
Age Group: Teen/Young Adult
Genre: Dystopian Fiction
Series: Chaos Walking, book one
Star Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: Chilling, horrific, and oddly tender, I loved The Knife of Never Letting Go--an amazing dystopian triumph of a novel!

This book was given to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Can you imagine being able to hear the thoughts of everyone around you, good and bad? Welcome to Prentisstown, where hearing your neighbors' thoughts is a fact of life. Todd Hewitt is on the delicate cusp of becoming a man, retrieving apples from the swamp with his dog Manchee. But returning from a routine walk, Todd suddenly encounters a secret that could turn his whole world upside down--and with it, he is on the run. Allying with a girl named Viola, Todd finds he must discover what it really means to be a man.. Even if it could cost him his very life..

What I enjoyed:
-I loved the premise of this scary dystopian--hearing everyone's thoughts, where one small error could get you killed
-The chilling, frightening, all too real setting of Prentisstown, ruled with an iron fist--at times I felt myself either horribly frightened, chilled to the bone, or disgusted
-Todd, the hilarious, wry main character, at times crude and coarse and at others surprisingly insightful and perceptive--I really related to and enjoyed him
-Viola was also a good star for the book--I loved how smart and kind of snarky she was, though in the beginning of the book it was hard to figure her out
-The pacing of this novel--it was breakneck once the chase started
-The chilling cast of characters surrounding Todd, especially Mr. Prentiss
-Ben and Cillian, of course
-I loved the way the mystery of this novel unfolded--I didn't see anything coming
-The ending--I wish I had the next one right this moment!

What could've been better:
-Before the chase, the book was a little hard to get into for me
-I wish the dystopian elements had been explained a little better

Any fan of dystopian sagas looking for a new one should snatch this one up--it is an absolute gem! Next on deck: The Golden Apple by Michelle Diener!

Saturday, March 22, 2014

Westward to Strange by Ray Litt Review

Title: Westward to Strange
Author: Ray Litt
Age Group: Teen/Young Adult
Genre: Horror
Series: Dark Water, book one
Star Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: Spooky, dark, and unpredictable, I really enjoyed Westward to Strange--a deliciously different horror novel that had me frantically turning pages! Wonderful!

This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Lula has always been drawn to the moon and the ocean. Having lived in Water's Edge her whole life, she notices strange things beginning to happen near the water: A mysterious boy named Morgan has appeared, she's hearing music, and her dreams have begun to grow steadily more frightening and vivid. Realizing that there must be a mystery with all this, Lula finds herself trying to delve into mysterious disappearances--and realizes that she may be more involved with Morgan and his secrets, more than she could've ever imagined..

What I enjoyed:
-I liked Lula's narration, and Lula herself, a strong, hilarious main character that I really related to--I was definitely rooting for her all the way
-The mystery was a huge part of why I liked the book--it unfolded beautifully and I couldn't guess what was about to happen--I was constantly guessing, especially with the White Horse
-The spooky, creepy atmosphere that is Water's Edge--it was dark and mysterious and utterly scary at some points
-I love the way mermaids were woven into the plot, more killer than cutesy--it was great
-The vibrant cast of characters that surrounded Lula, particularly Jake, Sarah, and Cass

What could've been better:
-At times the pacing was too quick for me and it made it a little hard to keep up, even after breaks
-I wish I had learned more about Lula's family, particularly about her father--the circumstances surrounding his death were sketchy, even after they were explained
-The ending fell a little short for me

I really enjoyed Westward to Strange! Anyone looking for a creepy, supernatural thriller should pick it up! Next on deck: The Knife of Never Letting Go by Patrick Ness!

Thursday, March 20, 2014

Empress of the Night: A Novel of Catherine the Great Review

Title: Empress of the Night: A Novel of Catherine the Great
Author: Eva Stachniak
Age Group: Adult
Genre: Historical Fiction
Series: Catherine the Great, book two
Star Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: A novel about the last days of Russia's most notorious queens, I really enjoyed Empress of the Night--it was absolutely lovely!

This book was given to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Catherine the Great, nearing death, reflects on her life and the extent of her rule, leading the reader down a twisted path of memories, secrets, power, and lies that gone on for years. She recounts how she has plotted, planned, and schemed to get where she is--all she has sacrificed. Sometimes brutal, cold, and calculating and at other times tender and dare I say vulnerable--readers are treated to a fictionalized account of the formidable monarch's later life.

What I liked:
-I liked Catherine--she was really a great main character, vulnerable and tender at times and completely brutal in others--she was really human to me
-The lush, opulent, frightening world of Imperial Russia, spanning to even the Romanovs
-The pacing of the novel was good, though I was a bit thrown by the fact that there were no chapters or any real break in the narration
-The characters that surrounded Catherine, particularly her large family and numerous lovers throughout her lifetime

What could've been better:
-At times, even with a helpful character guide at the beginning of the novel, I kept getting people mixed up and it was hard to follow
-Sometimes it was difficult to differentiate from memory in Catherine's mind to what was happening in the present
-Catherine confused me sometimes--it seemed in her younger years she was really preoccupied by having a lover, and it kind of threw off the story a little bit for me, though I know these were supposed to be her golden years
-The ending kind of threw me off a little bit
-Paul and Peter--especially Paul

Overall, I really enjoyed Empress of the Night! It was a lovely journey through Imperial Russia that had me utterly enthralled. Next on deck: Westward to Strange by Ray Litt! 

Tuesday, March 18, 2014

Thorn Abbey by Nancy Ohlin Review

Title: Thorn Abbey
Author: Nancy Ohlin
Age Group: Teen/Young Adult
Genre: Horror
Series: N/A
Star Rating: 2 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: A valiant, brave attempt to retell the classic gothic Rebecca, I think I would've enjoyed Thorn Abbey more if I hadn't read the original--something about this novel just fell short for me.

This book was given to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Tess arrives at Thorn Abbey, a fish out of water, struggling to fit in amongst trust fund babies and designer clothes. Humble, quiet, and shy, she finds herself in even deeper trouble when she falls for Max: a mysterious, brooding boy with something to hide. Despite warnings to stay away from him, she finds herself in love.. And watched by a strange presence. Convinced that beautiful, saintly Becca is watching her from beyond, Tess finds herself racing against time to solve the mystery of Becca's death.. Hoping and praying that she doesn't end up killed as well..

What I enjoyed:
-I liked Tess a lot--insecure and shy, with severe social anxiety, but gaining more confidence as the novel goes on
-Max, of course, brooding and sweet and romantic but hiding dark secrets
-I liked the way the author made it take place at a posh boarding school--in a way, that part was a fitting homage to Rebecca
-The resident spookiness--that, at least, reminded me of the original
-The big mystery--the character of Becca and the mystery surrounding her kept the novel going for me, even if it fell short otherwise
-Franklin
-Devon
-I really liked the way the novel ended

What could've been better:
-As I said before, I think I would've liked it better had I not read the original--for me, it just fell short
-I found myself predicting what was going to happen
-In the beginning of the book Tess didn't really do anything for me, despite trying to relate to her
-Devon's crazy mood swings, though explained later, kind of gave me whiplash

Thorn Abbey was a good try at putting a modern spin on a classic, but it just didn't work for me. Next on deck: Empress of The Night: A Novel of Catherine The Great by Eva Stachniak!

Sunday, March 16, 2014

Bound by Prophecy by Melissa Wright Review

Title: Bound by Prophecy
Author: Melissa Wright
Age Group: Teen/Young Adult
Genre: Fantasy/New Adult
Series: The Descendants, book one
Star Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: A hilarious, romantic thrill ride, I really enjoyed Bound by Prophecy--Aern's wry narration was a big selling point for me. Wonderful!

This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Aern Archer never wanted power. Content to sit at his brother's side in the magical Council, that all changes when he discovers Morgan has become power-hungry and will stop at nothing to claim his birthright, no matter what stands in his way. Forced to protect Brianna, a young woman with extraordinary powers, he meets Emily, her sister, who doesn't know how to take no for an answer and just wants her sister back. Reluctantly allying with one another, the two find that secrets hide even in the most unexpected of places.. And love can be found just about anywhere.

What I enjoyed:
-The pacing was breakneck from the start, and there was no stop to the action--I loved it!
-Aern's wry narration throughout the novel, world-weary and young all at once
-Aern himself, the boy reluctantly thrust into a familial power struggle that could well cost him his life
-Emily, and her determination to get her sister back--she was a perfect sarcastic counterpoint to grave, downtrodden Aern
-Brianna, as well as the solemn cast of characters that surrounds her
-Morgan, the creepy, sleazy villain obsessed with only acquiring more power

What could've been better:
-At times the sexual tension between the two was killing me and I wish it had been elaborated on a little earlier in the book
-I didn't really like Brendan
-I would've liked to know more about the prophecy--it was really vague and kind of hard to follow

I really enjoyed Bound by Prophecy--it was wonderful! Next on deck: Fire and Ice by Michele Barrow-Belisle!

Friday, March 14, 2014

Essence by A.L. Waddington Review

Title: Essence
Author: A.L. Waddington
Age Group: Teen/Young Adult
Genre: Fantasy/Romance
Series: Eve, book one
Star Rating: 1 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: I had really high hopes for Essence, especially seeing how users on Goodreads rated it, but honestly this book just wasn't for me.

This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Jocelyn Timmons has always considered herself a normal girl, if a little antisocial. When the mysterious, sexy Jackson Chandler moves in next door, she finds herself losing her mind--somehow in another place, another time. She's certain she knows Jackson, but she doesn't know why or even how. Despite all this, she is irresistibly drawn to him, and in this attraction lies secrets long buried.

What I enjoyed:
-I liked the concept of this novel--it was really distinct and different, and it was exciting
-The romance between Jocelyn and Jackson was nice, sweet, slowly becoming more passionate as the novel moved along
-Jocelyn's family in the present day

What could've been better:
-Jocelyn, to me, wasn't a relatable protagonist, especially her 1878 carnation--she seemed shallow and selfish, and I didn't get a lot of depth from her, and it made the book very hard to get through
-It felt as though the romance and attraction between Jackson and Jocelyn sprung up from nowhere, and I would've liked their relationship to go a little slower
-The 1878 parts of the novel didn't seem that relatable to me either--it felt as though the language in that time period was more modern that it should've been
-The concept of the time-traveling didn't make much sense to me; it was confusing and kind of hard to follow, and I really feel that it could've been explained better

I really wanted to love Essence, but it just didn't work for me, unfortunately. Next on deck: Bound by Prophecy by Melissa Wright!

Thursday, March 13, 2014

Chop Chop by Simon Wroe Review

Title: Chop Chop
Author: Simon Wroe
Age Group: Adult
Genre: Fiction
Series: N/A
Star Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: Wry, darkly humorous, and finely wrought, Wroe's debut Chop Chop was laugh-out-loud funny--it was wonderful! A gem for anyone looking for a fun, inside look at a restaurant kitchen, served with plenty of humor and wit!

This book was given to me by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Meet Monocle: the green commis chef at the restaurant The Swan. In desperate need of money fresh out of university, he finds himself, somehow, put in a restaurant kitchen, even though he couldn't care less about food. Quietly suffering alongside a cast of quirky characters, like Racist Dave (his name says it all), silent, stoic Harmony, and sadistic head chef Bob, our narrator finds himself knee-deep in kitchen politics, and he learns to face the family baggage he's been running from for as long as he can remember.

What I enjoyed:
-Monocle, first of all--he reminded me a bit of Dickens, with his wry, hilarious narration, and I really related to him as a character--he had a lot of depth and it made the book really enjoyable, as well as his character development
-The quirky cast of characters that made up the rest of the book--Ramilov, Racist Dave, Bob, and of course The Fat Man
-This book was so humorous--within three chapters I was roaring with laughter, and it didn't stop there, this book is hilarious
-I liked the way everything unfolded, and how despite the humor, there was darkness in the book as well, perfectly pitched
-I really liked the ending as well--it really did justice to all of the characters

What could've been better:
-I found Monocle's parents a little lacking in depth
-At times Bob's antics got a little too violent for my tastes

Despite some minor flaws, I really enjoyed this lovely debut--it was wonderful! Next on deck: Essence by A.L. Waddington!

The Bookman's Tale: A Novel of Obsession by Charlie Lovett Review

Title: The Bookman's Tale: A Novel of Obsession
Author: Charlie Lovett
Age Group: Adult
Genre: Thriller/Literary Fiction
Series: N/A
Star Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: An intelligent, mysterious, genre-bender of a novel, I was completely and utterly glued to The Bookman's Tale--I finished it in less than a day!

This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Peter Byerly has spent the last nine months mourning his late wife, Amanda. Trying to get away from concerned relatives and friends, he flees to England, hoping to find solace in his work: bookselling. But when he finds a Victorian painting of what looks suspiciously like Amanda, Peter becomes obsessed with discovering its origins, leading him on a race against and across time as he struggles to solve the mystery.. A mystery that just might be better left buried..

What I enjoyed:
-The tender, gentle prose that follows Peter across time--I couldn't stop reading!
-I really enjoyed the way the novel genre jumped: it seemed as though the author combined domestic fiction, thriller, and book porn all into one novel and spun it like Rumpelstiltskin with straw
-I liked the way it felt like three stories all at once: Amanda and Peter's courtship and marriage, the glimpses into Victorian England, and then the jump back to modern England
-One of the things I loved most about this book was how intelligent the mystery was, how well thought out it was--normally I can predict mysteries pretty well, but I didn't see this one coming!
-Peter--he was a really relatable character to me, especially with his anxiety, and I liked the way he grew throughout the novel
-Amanda--she was really the most human of all the characters to me, flawed but beautiful and sweet
-Lucy, the hilarious British smartass who accompanies Peter throughout this nail-biting adventure
-Amanda's family

What could've been better:
-Even though I liked the way the novel moved across time, it felt like as the pacing sped up it all got a little muddled
-It was hard to keep track of all the historical people during the Victorian areas of the book

I really, really liked The Bookman's Tale: A Novel of Obsession! Fans of The Da Vinci Code would love this one! Next on deck: Chop Chop by Simon Wroe!

Wednesday, March 12, 2014

The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo Review

Title: The Ghost Bride
Author: Yangze Choo
Age Group: Adult
Genre: Historical Fiction/Fantasy
Series: N/A
Star Rating: 5 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: Choo's debut novel has something for everyone--ghosts, demons, the afterlife, magic, and secrets--in short, I absolutely loved this novel! An amazing, beautiful triumph of a novel!

This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Li Lan is approached with an unusual proposition: her father asks her if she would like to become a ghost bride to a recently deceased son of a local, wealthy family. To do so would mean that she would be taken care of for the rest of her life. Soon Li Lan is haunted by terrifying dreams of Lim Tian Ching, and in a fit of depression and a frightening accident, she finds herself trapped in the spirit world.. And she doesn't know if she'll ever make it back to her family..

What I enjoyed:
-The haunting, lyrical prose that drew me in immediately--Li Lan's narrative was lush, descriptive, and beautiful
-The lush, beautiful, absolutely captivating setting of 1893 Malaya, gorgeous and so real I even found myself dreaming about it when I put the book down
-Li Lan herself, a strong main character, going to almost desperate lengths to save herself from her fate, and her character development was wonderful!
-I really enjoyed the scenes in The Plains of the Dead as well, and in Li Lan's dreams--at times it reminded me of Spirited Away
-Fan
-Er Lang in particular--he was a real favorite of mine
-The hilarious, layered cast of characters in Li Lan's house, particularly Amah
-Tian Bai
-The ending of the novel was perfect--it really did justice to all of the characters 

What could've been better:
-There was nothing I didn't love about this beautiful debut novel--I'm so glad that I read it!

I really, really liked The Ghost Bride--anyone looking for a good novel on Chinese culture should pick it up! Next on deck: The Bookman's Tale: A Novel of Obsession by Charlie Lovett!

Friday, March 7, 2014

The Keeper's Curse by Diana Harrison Review

Title: The Keeper's Curse
Author: Diana Harrison
Age Group: Teen/Young Adult
Genre: Fantasy
Series: N/A
Star Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: I really enjoyed this book--an engaging, romantic fantasy that swept me away, especially the main character!

This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Emmy's life changes forever when one night she is swept away by her mother into the magical world of Methelwood--a place where magic, darkness, and secrets are abundant. Reeling from leaving our world behind, she develops a strange bond with a boy named Breckin that goes deeper than she could've ever dreamed.. And could cost her just about everything..

What I enjoyed:
-I liked the pacing--it was good and really picked up in the second half of the novel
-I also enjoyed the world building--it was really well-thought out, though at first I felt like I was seeing a lot of parallels from the Harry Potter series
-Emmy--the star of the book and I related to her a lot--stubborn and funny and sweet, and a great protagonist
-Emmy's family, particularly Alex
-Breckin, and his complicated relationship with Emmy, as well as his fellow peers--he had a lot of depth and I really enjoyed him as a character
-Cyrus, of course--the reluctant antihero and bad boy--he was fun to experience as well
 -The mystery throughout the entire novel, perfectly paced

What could've been better:
-At the ending I really thought that Emmy's identity slipped away from her, just before the very end, and I wish it had done more justice to her feelings
-There were some very slight editing issues

Overall, I really liked The Keeper's Curse--it was a lovely book that I enjoyed reading! Next on deck: The Ghost Bride by Yangsze Choo!

Wednesday, March 5, 2014

Hounds of Autumn by Heather Blackwood Review

Title: Hounds of Autumn
Author: Heather Blackwood
Age Group: Adult
Genre: Steampunk/Mystery
Series: N/A
Star Rating: 3 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: A fun steampunk mystery, I really like Hounds of Autumn--it was a good, quick read!

This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Chloe Sullivan is an unconventional woman, to say the least. Instead of prim, proper, and demure, she is brash, strong, and fiddles around with inventions. Hers is a contented life with her older husband, Ambrose. When she receives word that another woman she's been corresponding with has been brutally murdered, she inadvertently finds herself drawn into a web of family politics, secrets, and lies--and finds herself risking her very life to solve the riddle of her friend's death..

What I enjoyed:
-I liked the environment of steampunk London, and then the beautiful, lush countryside of the English moors, the perfect backdrop for a dramatic murder mystery
-Chloe, and her fierce independence--she was a great protagonist that I enjoyed, feisty and fierce and every bit herself, and not ashamed of it, especially with the time period
-The pacing was good--it flowed very well
-I enjoyed Chloe's husband, Ambrose, sweet and gentle and loving, a perfect match for Chloe
-I liked the ending too--it was perfect!

What could've been better:
-The family politics muddled the main mystery for me and was hard to follow--it got especially bad when things with the murder started to pick up
-The family themselves were hard to follow--there were just so many people in the household and it was hard to keep up during the later portions of the novel

Despite its flaws, I enjoyed The Hounds of Autumn--a good choice for any of you guys who enjoy steampunk, mysteries, or strong main characters. Next on deck: The Keeper's Curse by Diana Harrison!

Saturday, March 1, 2014

Shadowflesh by Shawn Martin Review

Title: Shadowflesh
Author: Shawn Martin
Age Group: Teen/Young Adult
Genre: Fantasy/Romance
Series: Shadowflesh, book one
Star Rating: 4 out of 5 stars
The bottom line: Dark, romantic, and gothic, I really enjoyed this creepy thriller with its elements of sweet, sexy romance--the interesting premise was great too! I really liked it.

This book was given to me by the author in exchange for an honest review.

Aileen McCormick has just moved into her grandmother's creepy house. Heartbroken over leaving her friends, she is angry and resentful, trying to fit in at a new school. But when she meets Addison Wake, a mysterious, beautiful boy she can't help but be drawn to, her life changes forever: She encounters darkness, magic, and first love. Only problem is, she might not make it out with her life intact..

What I liked:
-I liked the premise of the novel--the concept of the magic kind of reminded me of The Picture of Dorian Gray
-I liked Aileen, the girl who falls passionately in love with Addison--I felt like I was seventeen again, reading how she narrated the novel
-Addison, possibly one of the most complex characters in the book--he was absolutely swoon-worthy and when the romance began between him and Aileen, I couldn't put the book down
-I liked the way the book genre jumped from mystery, fantasy, romance and back--this book really has something for everyone
-I really liked Aileen's family as well, especially her grandmother and sister
-I really liked the ending as well--it was perfect and I cannot wait for the sequel!

What could've been better:
-A lot of the time, especially at the beginning, I definitely felt a Twilight-esque vibe with Addison and Aileen, and it was a tad off putting, to be honest
-Geoff, Barrett and Zach--one scene near the end of the novel nearly had me shivering with chills
-Aileen's new friends seemed a tad one-dimensional and they were hard to relate to

I really, really liked Shadowflesh! It was a lovely read. Anyone looking for a good, dark romance should grab it. Next on deck: Hounds of Autumn by Heather Blackwood!